Around the World in 80 Bites – Bite 25

Bite 25 – Bread

Man cannot live on bread alone but Kimberley can. I love bread! No matter where I go in the world nor what type of cuisine I encounter there is always some sort of bread. It’s the one thing that every culture has in culinary common.

quick, yeasted, un/leavened, flat, loaf, buns, rustic, sourdough, enriched, artisan, plain 

And the bread beat goes on…

Bread is the one food I have been eating my whole life and have never tired of it. I have now earned my artisan bread baking certificate and continue to put it to good and regular use. Occasionally I am without my daily bread but too long without and all is not right in my world. Bread is the staff of my life.

No crying over spilled milk

Why are some people so fanatically passionate about cooking as their life’s purpose?

Food at its most basic is for everyone. Without it and air and water, we would not survive. Cooking is not to everyone’s taste but contrast staying in a cooking competition to experiencing poverty, malnutrition and/or hunger.

For the former, being eliminated from a televised cooking program seems like the end of the world whereas for the latter it’s a matter of life and death. Shouldn’t those who are impoverished with little if any food security be the ones in tears rather than those who have the privilege to continue cooking and eating long after the cameras stop rolling?

Passion and one’s expression of it is personal and indeed imperative for the wellness of the soul but the bigger picture of food security seems to get lost in the context of televised entertainment.

While I am currently enjoying Top Chef Canada, Masterchef Australia and Next Food Network Star, I am reminded of the rock star status attributed to top chefs and the amateur cooks who aspire to the same.

Though they don’t have rockstar status nor get much airtime here are a few organizations that address the issue of food security.

Bread for the world – Have faith, end hunger 

http://bread.org

Food Share – Demonstrating a sustainable & accessible food system for all

http://foodshare.net

Community food centres Canada – Good food is just the beginning 

https://cfccanada.ca

Canadian feed the children

http://www.canadianfeedthechildren.ca

 

Lively up your shelf! Spice a-peel

Kimberley’s holiday kitchen 

It’s Easter time and that means chocolate eggs and hot cross buns! Traditionally eaten on Good Friday, hot cross buns are enriched bread made with spices and citrus zest/peel. They are marked on top with the symbol of the cross, made from either a flavourless flour water mix or a mix of powdered sugar and milk.

This weekend I undertook a hot cross extravaganza and made hot cross cookies, scones and my signature buns known as hot cross bunnies; obviously made in the shape of a (Easter) bunny.

Hot cross scones
Hot cross cookies

Previously I have made hot cross brownies and plan to make hot cross pancakes and muffins for next year.

Many recipes for hot cross buns call for ‘mixed spice’. So what exactly is in this blend?

Hot Cross Bun spice mix:

2 teaspoons of true cinnamon
½ teaspoon allspice
½ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon clove

This quantity will be more than sufficient for one full batch of hot cross buns. Use the leftover spice blend to make cookies, scones, cake or whatever else you can think of to ‘hot crossify’.

*For best flavour, grind the spices fresh just before using in a recipe.
*For more pungency double the amounts of allspice, nutmeg and clove.