Around the World in 80 Bites – Bite 24

Bite 24 – gingerbread

‘Tis the season to stock my gingerbread survival kit. In it I put fairly traded and powdered ginger and true cinnamon. I also have on hand some powdered clove, cassia and allspice. A combination of date molasses and maple syrup provide the sticky sweetness that goes so well in gingerbread cookies, cakes and scones.

I love gingerbread! Starting November and going into January it is a warm and comforting food that becomes one of my winter staples. To learn more about the origins of  gingerbread, see the following link:

http://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-gingerbread/

 

Around the World in 80 Bites: Bite 23

Bite 23: Tim Hortons

http://www.timhortons.com/ca/en/index.php

As a (usually) proud Canadian I grew up eating doughnuts from Tim’s. Also known as Timmy’s or TH in ASL (sign language). Founded in 1964 by a hockey player for the Toronto Maple Leafs (3 guesses for his name!) it has grown into an iconic Canadian institution. Over the years, doughnut flavours have come and gone while more products have been added to the menu. There are also seasonal and regional items and a yearly prize-giving contest that helps drum up more business.

Photo by Kimberley (c)2016
Photo by Kimberley (c)2016

Tim’s also has some community initiatives supporting kids (children’s foundation and camp) and sponsoring hockey.

If you’re looking for a reasonably priced hit of easily consumable sugar, fat and salt and don’t mind waiting in line then Tim’s is the place.

Around the World in 80 Bites – Bite 22

Simit Photo by Kimberley (c)2011
Simit
Photo by Kimberley (c)2011

Bite 22 – Simit 

Simit is basically a Turkish bagel. This street food is coated in seeds and can be made with refined flour or whole grain. Once the dough is made, then formed into an oversized doughnut shape, it is coated in molasses. This gives the simit its characteristic hint of sweetness.

“Man cannot live on bread alone” but this woman can and did. While travelling Turkey for 3 weeks, simit was my staple food. Easy to find, cheap and filling, it can be eaten plain as a snack, filled with vegetables, dipped in eggplant purée or spread with cheese or nut butter.